Difficulty: Beginner/Intermediate


Bob is my first CTF VM that I have ever made so be easy on me if it's not perfect.

The Milburg Highschool Server has just been attacked, the IT staff have taken down their windows server and are now setting up a linux server running Debian. Could there a few weak points in the new unfinished server?


Your Goal is to get the flag in /

Hints: Remember to look for hidden info/files

Box Info: Tested on VirtualBox using DHCP Host-only & Bridged Adapter types.

File Type: OVA

Background:

Pinky is creating his very own website! He has began setting up services and some simple web applications

Description:

A realistic Boot2Root box. Gain access to the system and read the root.txt.


Difficulty to get user: Easy/Intermediate

Difficulty to get root: Easy/Intermediate


If you need a hint or have a question contact me on twitter: @Pink_P4nther

THE ARM IoT EXPLOIT LABORATORY - Damn Vulnerable ARM Router (DVAR)

DVAR is an emulated Linux based ARM router running a vulnerable web server that you can sharpen your ARM stack overflow skills with.

DVAR runs in the tinysploitARM VMWare VM under a fully emulated QEMU ARM router image.

Simply extract the ZIP file and launch the VM via tinysploitARM.vmx. After starting up, the VM's IP address and default URL shall be displayed on the console. Using your host computer's browser, navigate to the URL and follow the instructions and clues. The virtual network adapter is set to NAT mode.

Your goal is to write a working stack overflow exploit for the web server running on the DVAR tinysploitARM target.

SHA256: 1f2bdd9ae4e44443dbb4bf9062300f1991c47f609426a1d679b8dcd17abb384c

DVAR started as an optional preparatory exercise for the ARM IoT Exploit Lab.

UPCOMING ARM IoT EXPLOIT LABORATORY TRAINING

RECON Brussels 2018 (4 day) January 29-Feb 1 https://recon.cx/2018/brussels/training/trainingexploitlab.html

Offensivecon Berlin 2018 (4 day) February 12-15 https://www.offensivecon.org/trainings/2018/the-arm-iot-exploit-laboratory-saumil-shah.html

Cansecwest Vancouver 2018 (4 day) March 10-13 https://cansecwest.com/dojos/2018/exploitlab.html

SyScan360 Singapore 2018 (4 day) March 18-21 https://www.coseinc.com/syscan360/index.php/syscan360/details/SYS1842#regBox

Helpful material

If you are new to the world of ARM exploitation, I highly recommend Azeria's excellent tutorials on ARM Assembly, ARM Shellcode and the basics of ARM exploitation.

https://azeria-labs.com/ Twitter: @Fox0x01

And these are three general purpose concepts oriented tutorials that every systems enthusiast must know:

Operating Systems - A Primer: http://www.slideshare.net/saumilshah/operating-systems-a-primer

How Functions Work: http://www.slideshare.net/saumilshah/how-functions-work-7776073

Introduction to Debuggers: http://www.slideshare.net/saumilshah/introduction-to-debuggers

EXPLOIT LABORATORY BLOG:

http://blog.exploitlab.net/

Saumil Shah @therealsaumil

VM Name:

BlackMarket

VM Description:

BlackMarket VM presented at Brisbane SecTalks BNE0x1B (28th Session) which is focused on students and other InfoSec Professional. This VM has total 6 flag and one r00t flag. Each Flag leads to another Flag and flag format is flag{blahblah}.

Shoutout to @RobertWinkel and @dooktwit for hosting at SecTalk Brisbane

If you get stuck in rabbit hole and need hints hit me up on twitter. Have fun!

VM Difficulty Level:

Beginner/Intermediate

What will you learn?

Learn about how to enumerate your target and join dots in order to pwn this VM.

VM Tested:

VMware Player VirtualBox

Networking:

DHCP Enabled

Author:

AcEb0mb3R Twitter: @Acebomber911

It was a part of HackTheBox platform.

Difficulty:

Beginner

Description:

Mr. Derp and Uncle Stinky are two system administrators who are starting their own company, DerpNStink. Instead of hiring qualified professionals to build up their IT landscape, they decided to hack together their own system which is almost ready to go live...

Instructions:

This is a boot2root Ubuntu based virtual machine. It was tested on VMware Fusion and VMware Workstation12 using DHCP settings for its network interface. It was designed to model some of the earlier machines I encountered during my OSCP labs also with a few minor curve-balls but nothing too fancy. Stick to your classic hacking methodology and enumerate all the things!

Your goal is to remotely attack the VM and find all 4 flags eventually leading you to full root access. Don't forget to #tryharder

Example: flag1(AB0BFD73DAAEC7912DCDCA1BA0BA3D05). Do not waste time decrypting the hash in the flag as it has no value in the challenge other than an identifier.

Contact

Hit me up if you enjoy this VM! Twitter: @securekomodo Email: [email protected]

You have been hired to do a penetration test on the W1R3S.inc individual server and report all findings. They have asked you to gain root access and find the flag (located in /root directory).

Difficulty to get a low privileged shell: Beginner/Intermediate

Difficulty to get privilege escalation: Beginner/Intermediate

About: This is a vulnerable Ubuntu box giving you somewhat of a real world scenario and reminds me of the OSCP labs.

If you need any hints, pointers or have questions feel free to email me: specterinthewires at gmail dot com

Virtual Machine: VMware Workstation

Difficulty: Beginner/Intermediate

About: This is the VM used in the online qualifications phase of the CTF-USF 2017 (Capture the Flag - Suceava University) contest which addresses to universities students. The VM was created by Oana Stoian (@gusu_oana) and Teodor Lupan (@theologu) from Safetech Innovations, the technical partner of the contest.

Instructions: The CTF is a virtual machine and has been tested in Virtual Box. The network interface of the virtual machine will take it's IP settings from DHCP.

Flags: There are 5 flags that should be discovered in form of: Country_name Flag: [md5 hash]. In CTF platform of the CTF-USV competition there was a hint available for each flag, but accessing it would imply a penalty. If you need any of those hints to solve the challenge, send me a message on Twitter @gusu_oana and I will be glad to help. The countries that should be tracked for flags are: Croatia, France, Italy, Laos, Phillippines

ARM Lab: 1

Azeria 17 Nov 2017

ARM Lab Environment

Let’s say you got curious about ARM assembly or exploitation and want to write your first assembly scripts or solve some ARM challenges. For that you either need an Arm device (e.g. Raspberry Pi), or you set up your lab environment in a VM for quick access.

This page contains 3 levels of lab setup laziness.

  • Manual Setup – Level 0
  • Ain’t nobody got time for that – Level 1
  • Ain’t nobody got time for that – Level 2

Manual Setup – Level 0

If you have the time and nerves to set up the lab environment yourself, I’d recommend doing it. You might get stuck, but you might also learn a lot in the process. Knowing how to emulate things with QEMU also enables you to choose what ARM version you want to emulate in case you want to practice on a specific processor.

How to emulate Raspbian with QEMU.


Ain’t nobody got time for that – Level 1

Welcome on laziness level 1. I see you don’t have time to struggle through various linux and QEMU errors, or maybe you’ve tried setting it up yourself but some random error occurred and after spending hours trying to fix it, you’ve had enough.

Don’t worry, here’s a solution: Hugsy (aka creator of GEF) released ready-to-play Qemu images for architectures like ARM, MIPS, PowerPC, SPARC, AARCH64, etc. to play with. All you need is Qemu. Then download the link to your image, and unzip the archive.

Become a ninja on non-x86 architectures


Ain’t nobody got time for that – Level 2

Let me guess, you don’t want to bother with any of this and just want a ready-made Ubuntu VM with all QEMU stuff setup and ready-to-play. Very well. The first Azeria-Labs VM is ready. It’s a naked Ubuntu VM containing an emulated ARMv6l.

This VM is also for those of you who tried emulating ARM with QEMU but got stuck for inexplicable linux reasons. I understand the struggle, trust me.

Download here:

VMware image size:

  • Downloaded zip: Azeria-Lab-v1.7z (4.62 GB)
    • MD5: C0EA2F16179CF813D26628DC792C5DE6
    • SHA1: 1BB1ABF3C277E0FD06AF0AECFEDF7289730657F2
  • Extracted VMware image: ~16GB

Password: azerialabs

Host system specs:

  • Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS 64-bit (kernel 4.10.0-38-generic) with Gnome 3
  • HDD: ~26GB (ext4) + ~4GB Swap
  • RAM (configured): 4GB

QEMU setup:

  • Raspbian 8 (27-04-10-raspbian-jessie) 32-bit (kernel qemu-4.4.34-jessie)
  • HDD: ~8GB
  • RAM: ~256MB
  • Tools: GDB (Raspbian 7.7.1+dfsg-5+rpi1) with GEF

I’ve included a Lab VM Starter Guide and set it as the background image of the VM. It explains how to start up QEMU, how to write your first assembly program, how to assemble and disassemble, and some debugging basics. Enjoy!

Instructions

The boot2root is a Debian virtual machine and has been fully tested using VMWare Workstation 12. The network interface of the virtual machine will take it's IP settings from DHCP.

Level

Beginner to Intermediate.

Description

Cyberry are eagerly anticipating the release of their new "Berrypedia" website, a life-long project which offers knowledge and insight into all things Berry!

Challenge

The challenge is to get root. Rooting this box will require a wide variety of skills and techniques, and you may find that there is more than one way to achieve this. Whilst the boot2root itself can technically be completed offline, you will almost certainly require some form of internet access (Search engine) at your disposal to move forward past some of the challenges. If you get completely stuck please tweet us @cyberrysec for a hint.

We really look forward to reading the walkthroughs on vulnhub of how you achieved root :-)